Shriek: An Afterword

Shriek: An Afterword

An epic yet personal look at several decades of life, love, and death in the imaginary city of Ambergris--previously chronicled in Jeff VanderMeer's acclaimed City of Saints & Madmen--Shriek: An Afterword relates the scandalous, heartbreaking, and horrifying secret history of two squabbling siblings and their confidantes, protectors, and enemies.

Narrated with flamboyant intensity and under increasingly urgent conditions by ex-society figure Janice Shriek, this afterword presents a vivid gallery of characters and events, emphasizing the adventures of Janice's brother Duncan, a historian obsessed with a doomed love affair and a secret that may kill or transform him; a war between rival publishing houses that will change Ambergris forever; and the gray caps, a marginalized people armed with advanced fungal technologies who have been waiting underground for their chance to mold the future of the city.

Part academic treatise, part tell-all biography, after this introduction to the Family Shriek, you'll never look at history in quite the same way again.

Title:Shriek: An Afterword
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780765314659
Format Type:

    Shriek: An Afterword Reviews

  • Gabrielle

    Updated review after a re-read in November 2018.---Jeff VanderMeer has imagination in spades, that’s obvious the minute you crack any of his books open. Every story set in the city of Ambergris has ...

  • Brad

    We book lovers can’t help speaking of authors as “the next ....” We’re always keeping our eyes open for the next Jane Austen or the next Ernest Hemingway or the next Salman Rushdie or the next...

  • Dan Schwent

    I've been waiting for Jeff VanderMeer to write a novel set in Ambergris since City of Saints and Madmen.Thoughts from the halfway mark: The first half of the book is Janice Shriek telling the story of...

  • C.

    A review on the back of this book name-checks Nick Cave and "Hitchhikers Guide" -- please ignore the back of the book. I can't imagine anything less like Douglas Adams than this book. If I had to writ...

  • Amy (Other Amy)

    He said: "A machine. A glass. A mirror. A broken machine. A cracked glass. A shattered mirror." I remember now the way he used the phrases at his disposal. Clean, fine cuts. Great, slashing cuts. Frac...

  • Brooke

    I find myself thinking about Shriek in the same way I thought about its predecessor, City of Saints and Madmen. In other words, I'm not sure quite what to think about it. It has all the things that ma...

  • fo jammi

    Tarted up in a fin de siecle gaudiness and moldering crepe, Jeff VanDerMeer's latest tale of the decadent and unusual goings-on in the fantastical city of Ambergris promises raised eyebrows and wry hu...

  • Michael Harrel

    I recently went through a harvest of Listmania lists on Amazon, from those I found on the page for China Meiville's "Perdido Street Station". It seemed like a promising way to break into reading the c...

  • Loren

    From ISawLightningFall.comDuring my misspent youth and a fair bit of my adulthood, I steeped myself in more fantastic fiction that I care to admit. As one book rolled into another and another, a patte...

  • Chadwick

    I don't know, clever, but it just didn't do it. I think VanderMeer might be too fundamentally sane to accomplish the decadent style that he aspires to here. Get more insane, do more drugs, or be more ...